1.
And here I thought I was fighting a war, trapped inside my head all day. How everything seems microscopic when faced with the world at large.

2.
The alert arrived at the newsroom around four in the afternoon. I got out of bed an hour later, not knowing. At six, words run in a loop on the screen. I am typing at my desk, tapping on my phone, knowing I’m not doing enough.

3.
Asking what the world has come to is like asking why water is wet. But my chest feels heavy just the same, and the question falls from my lips all the same.

“I reason, Earth is short…” (301)
Emily Dickinson

I reason, Earth is short —
And Anguish — absolute —
And many hurt,
But, what of that?

I reason, we could die —
The best Vitality
Cannot excel Decay,
But, what of that?

I reason that in Heaven —
Somehow, it will be even —
Some new Equation, given —
But, what of that?

This is from The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson, edited by Thomas H. Johnson, published by Little, Brown & Company, 1960.

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Why I am no good at the stage, why I always feel like running away, and when I am ready to do so I try very hard to remember all my friends who choose to sit in the quiet with someone like me.

Once I sat at a round table full with famous elbows. I felt so very little, so very unnecessary. And so glad—because I can stand up and walk away, and I did.

I’m Nobody! Who are you? (288)
Emily Dickinson

I’m Nobody! Who are you?
Are you — Nobody — Too?
Then there’s a pair of us!
Don’t tell! they’d advertise — you know!

How dreary — to be — Somebody!
How public — like a Frog —
To tell one’s name — the livelong June —
To an admiring Bog!

This is from The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson, edited by Thomas H. Johnson, published by Little, Brown & Company, 1960.

Feeling a bit lazy on a Monday afternoon. Yesterday I went out with two lovely friends and had the most wonderful time. We watched a play, Shakespeare in Hollywood, and I enjoyed it immensely. I haven’t seen any plays in awhile, and I’m glad I went to this one. What else was yesterday about? In no particular order: white Toblerone with wasabi cake, plagiarism, living in a commune, coffee, book hunting, Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Lowell, suicide, digital cameras, guys with facial hair, ladies who lunch, tropical fruit shakes, Palawan, R., freelancing, pest control, Irish christening gowns, leaving an extra tip for a cute waiter, walking around Makati, bass players, construction workers, pizza topped with arugula and truffle oil, A., Paul Auster and Siri Hustvedt, helping a reporter out, and more.

Sometimes I can’t believe these two picked me as their friend. I feel so lucky.

“It’s all I have to bring today…” (26)
Emily Dickinson

It’s all I have to bring today —
This, and my heart beside —
This, and my heart, and all the fields —
And all the meadows wide —
Be sure you count — should I forget
Some one the sum could tell —
This, and my heart, and all the Bees
Which in the Clover dwell.

This is from The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson, edited by Thomas H. Johnson, published by Little, Brown & Company, 1960.

Found this at the library the other day. Wow.

“I felt a Funeral, in my Brain…” (280)
Emily Dickinson

I felt a Funeral in my Brain,
And Mourners, to and fro,
Kept treading — treading — till it seemed
That Sense was breaking through —

And when they all were seated,
A Service, like a Drum —
Kept beating — beating — till I thought
My Mind was going numb —

And then I heard them lift a Box
And creak across my Soul
With those same Boots of Lead, again,
Then Space — began to toll

As all the Heavens were a Bell,
And Being, but an Ear,
And I, and Silence, some strange Race
Wrecked, solitary, here —

And then a Plank in Reason, broke,
And I dropped down, and down —
And hit a World, at every plunge,
And Finished knowing — then —

This is from The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson, edited by Thomas H. Johnson, published by Little, Brown & Company, 1960.